PRB Conference Program

2017 Annual Meeting Program

Sunday, April 9

10:30 AM — 11:30 AM — EEI/LCFP Executive Session (Closed Session – Officers Meeting)

Monday, April 10

Hospitality Suite open to all Attendees
  • Speakers
    • Welcome – Introductions – Chair Report Announcements
      Abstract
      Larry Shackelford, Principal Engineer - Risk Management, Southern Company
    • Renewable Energy Risks
      Abstract
      Justin Leany, Loss Control Engineer, PG&E
    • Infrared Testing
      Abstract
      Dan Malagoli, President, Infrared Testing, Inc.
    • Fire Loss Database
      Abstract
      Justin Leany, Loss Control Engineer, PG&E
    • Codes & Standards Update
      Abstract
      Byron Ellis, Sr. Staff Risk Engineer, Entergy Services, Inc.
    • Alternatives to CO2 for Combustion Turbine Protection
      Abstract
      Paul Hayes, CEO, American Fire Technologies Inc
    • Recent AEP Losses
      Abstract
      Dennis M. Kovach, Engineer Principal, American Electric Power - AEP
    • Upcoming Changes to NFPA 850
      Abstract
      Mark Boone, Sr., P.E., Manager, Corporate Risk Engineering, Dominion Resources
    • Closing Remarks and Adjourn
      Abstract
      Larry Shackelford, Principal Engineer - Risk Management, Southern Company
Coal handling catastrophic equipment failures can result in fire, costly repairs, forced outages and injury to personnel. Implementing a predictive maintenance program can help reduce cost, unplanned failures, and safety risks. This workshop will give an overview of why predictive maintenance is important to reliability. It will cover the basic fundamentals of vibration analysis, oil analysis, thermography, and airborne ultrasonic programs, and how to implement an effective and efficient condition based maintenance program. It will also cover how to develop a reporting methodology to effectively communicate failures to key stakeholders. Finally, it will give an overview of some of the challenges faced while implementing a predictive maintenance program.
  • Instructors
    • Mark Mayworm, Ex. Director, Gen. Support, Westar Energy
    • Brad Diederich, Predictive Maintenance Analyst, Westar Energy
This course will provide the principles, key insights, and foundational knowledge of Human Performance Improvement.
"Objectives:
1. Discuss and demonstrate the principles and key insights of HPI.
2. Explore additional HPI foundational concepts, including:
• Performance Modes and Related Error Modes.
• Traps, Triggers, and Tools.
• Taxonomy and Psychology of Deviation.
3. Develop and demonstrate proficiency in Error-Reduction tools:
• Phonetic Alphabet
• 3-Way Communication
• Self-Check/TV-STAR
• Pre-Job Brief
• Questioning Attitude
• Stop When Unsure
• Post-Job Review
• Peer Check
4. Explore what beyond the tools is required for long term success.
  • Instructor
    • Wes Havard, Manager of Operational Excellence & HPI, Luminant

6:00 PM — 9:00 PM — EEI/LCFP Attends the PRB Coal Users' Group 16th Anniversary Celebration

Join us for an electrifying evening filled with magical wonder. Open bar, hot hors d’oeuvres, and time to catch up with your peers and meet others as we celebrate another awesome Annual Meeting! Come and be dazzled with bold and innovative demonstrations of impossible phenomenon, recognize others, and plenty of surprises in store…remember winner’s must be present!

Tuesday, April 11

  • Speakers
    • Bill A. Konefes, Power Plant Superintendent, Georgia-Pacific
    • Larry Shackelford P.E., Principal Engineer-Risk Management, Southern Company
On October 22, 2012, a significant explosion occurred in the coal bunker at Minnesota Power’s Taconite Harbor Energy Center. This explosion severely injured an employee working near the explosion. You will hear about the experience firsthand from the employee involved in the incident. The presentation will focus on incident investigation and root cause, what engineering and administrative controls were implemented as a result of the accident, and improvements made across the thermal generating fleet. Hear how Joe and Minnesota Power thought they had done everything right, but how everything went so wrong.
  • Speaker
    • Joe Fredrickson, Operations Field Specialist, Minnesota Power
Coal is still King in Southeast Asia. Indonesia is building 17,500 MWs of coal-fired in the next 5 years. The Philippines has committed to 12 new coal-fired plants with another 14 proposed. Malaysia is bringing on two new 1,000MW supercritical plants in 2017 and constructing several more. Thailand plans for 2,000MWs of additional coal-fired capacity. The coal supply is Low CV Sub-bituminous coal from Indonesia. The Chinese are the lead supplier of these coal plants - cheap and fast track projects. A year in review of the good, the bad and the ugly.
  • Speaker
    • Randy Rahm, President, CoalTech Consultants
Recipients of the prestigious "Plant of the Year" recognition are noted for their continual improvement efforts. Mingle with the recipients over the last 15 years to learn of their successes, challenges, and improvements over the years and where do they see themselves in the near future.
  • Speakers
    • Troy Samples, Fuels Manager, Alabama Power
    • Erik E. Grimes, Unit/System Owner, Alabama Power
The 2017 PRB Coal Users' Group "Plant of the Year" shares their journey of continuous improvements and industry better practices.
We live in Changing Times in all areas. Power generation and coal transportation is no exception. This session focuses on insights, in these changing times, of the new administration’s perspectives on coal and updates about the transportation of coal.
  • Speakers
    • Karen Obenshain, Senior Director, Fuels, Technology & Commercial Policy, Edison Electric Institute
    • Janet Gellici, CEO, The National Coal Council, Inc.
    • Kipp Coddington, Director, Energy Policy & Economics, University of Wyoming
Painting ceilings, walls, structures, and fixtures white in coal handling areas. Replacing light fixtures with new energy efficient, bright lights. What is this “craziness” all about? Hear from those who have made changes and now workers are “seeing things for the first time.”
  • Panelists
    • Curtis Bloomfield, Senior Engineer, Tuscon Electric Power
    • Tae Cruz, Plant Engineer, Southern Company
    • John Forbes, Plant Manager, C.P. Crane Station
There is a saying “if coal is in the bunkers or silos, then everything is good” But is it? In today’s market, coal units are cycling more and more so what does this mean to preventing fires and explosions within bunkers and silos? Learn from your peers what they are doing to manage coal in bunkers and silos in these cycling times. This discussion will be led by the members of the Board of Directors of the PRB Coal Users' Group.
  • Moderator/Chair
    • Bill A. Konefes, Power Plant Superintendent, Georgia-Pacific

Wednesday, April 12

A case study of a large consumer of PRC coal and their continual improvements to control dust while managing safety and efficiencies. This presentation includes using safer technology to manage dust from 28 coal silos once using six dry dust collectors. Hear their story about containing coal particles and dust as it moves through a complexed system.
  • Speakers
    • Andrew M. Dobrazanski, Production Manager, DTE Energy
    • Phil Oster, Technology Manager Dust Collection, Benetech Inc.
Now what do you do? In one-hand, is the PRB Coal Users’ Group Recommended Practice on Hazardous Electrical Classifications and wondering what to do with the other hand? This presentation is a practical approach how to identify hazardous area classification and document and communicate findings.
  • Speaker
    • Brice Chastain, Manager Safety and Health, Georgia-Pacific
In 2016 Prairie States Generating Company (PSGC) used Rope Access techniques to complete a visual inspection of the Water Walls, the Fire Side of the Burners and Platen SH sections. Many Utilities have used Rope Access for Stack Inspections, and some have used them for SDA tower and piping support inspections. The Rope Access method was selected due to time constraints and a plan to not install scaffolding above a deck closing off the furnace hopper throat. The rigging consisted of horizontal traverse cables in the middle and on the trailing edge of the platen SH, 1’ below the roof. A scaffold deck was built above the arch, adjacent to each side wall that provided access to the rigging. The visual inspection identified several areas that required replacement or repair, which were completed by working out of baskets or picks. The Burner and Water Wall inspections were completed by lowering climbing ropes thru observation ports or where IR Sootblowers had been removed. The lower furnace inspections were completed quickly working off of the deck that closed the throat, with only a few items noted…
  • Speakers
    • Donald Mock, Sr. Engineering Analyst, Boiler QA/QC, Prairie State Generating Company, LLC
    • John Solowij, Project Manager, Acuren Inspection Services
During last year’s PRB conference, DTE Energy employees presented on a Dynamic Classifier project that was underway at their Monroe Power Plant facility and its potential benefits to the overall performance to the plant. Fast forward a year; DTE Energy now has three units converted for a total of 21 coal mills with dynamic classifiers.
As a follow up to last year’s presentation, DTE Energy will present on the lessons learned as each unit came online. The presentation will focus on the overall installation process, logic controls and configuration changes that were incorporated into each subsequent unit that allowed them to achieve and exceed their original projections.
  • Speakers
    • Dominic Martino, Senior Engineer Pulverizer\Gearbox SME, DTE Energy
    • James Musselman, Senior Production Engineer – I&C, DTE Energy
Hear about this coal crusher case study from Omaha Public Power Districts' Nebraska City Station. While they had utilized their crusher for many years, they looked at the value of the auxiliary load involved in crushing coal and chose to take it out of service. Come hear what they discovered through the process. Find out if they are crushing coal today or benefiting from the sale of their previous crusher auxiliary load.
  • Speaker
    • Clint Zavadil, Supervisor-Machinist, Omaha Public Power District
The legend of using carbon dioxide to extinguish fires in coal silos, bunkers, bins, hoppers, mills, or pulverizers lives on. What are the myths and the reality of carbon dioxide extinguishing a fire? This case study will separate the myths from the reality providing the industry's recommended/better practices in preparedness and response to coal silo, bunker, bins, hopper, mills, or pulverizers fires.
  • Speaker
    • The Good CO2 - The Myths, the Reality
      Abstract
      Mr. Bob Taylor, President, CoalSAFETY, Inc.
      Co-Authors
      • Mike Greiner, President, Hazard Control Technologies, INC.
During times of budget constraints and new regulations we are being forced to rethink our Maintenance Strategies and Housekeeping practices. We will discuss Plant Scherer's decision to replace the vibratory feeders with new gravity feeders. Our old feeders were costly, required constant maintenance and caused dusting issues. With the new CCR/ELG regulations choosing these feeders helped reduce our water use. The vibratory feeders also had an effect on moving coal efficiently and caused train unloading delays. We have reduced our contractor costs and down times with gravity feeders.
  • Speaker
    • Andy Waldrop, Fuels Manager at Plant Scherer, Southern Company
  • Speakers
    • Amy Strauss P.E., Plant Engineer, City Utilities,SWPS
    • Chad Owens, Plant Engineer, City Utilities,SWPS
    • James O'Neal, ., City Utilities,SWPS
Many aging coal-fired power plants will need to upgrade their existing electrostatic precipitators (ESP) to become more reliable with less maintenance costs, all while having higher collection efficiencies. In performing these upgrades, plants should consider replacing their existing power supplies [transformer rectifier (TR) sets], with state-of-the-art power supplies and controls that provide improved performance.
In this presentation, the results of a precipitator rebuild and repowering project will be discussed. This presentation highlights this strategy and helps the end user understand the benefits of the technology used.
  • Speakers
    • Steven Marchigiano, Plant Manager – Duke Energy Crystal River, Duke Energy
    • Robert Hummell, Innovation Leader/Customer Solutions Consultant, Babcock & Wilcox
      Co-Authors
      • Robert Hummell, Innovation Leader/Customer Solutions Consultant, Babcock & Wilcox
Calaveras Power Station has seen its fair share of combustible dust events over the years. A change in the safety culture at CPS Energy, followed by a significant deflagration event in 2014 prompted the need for action. A third party engineering consultant was hired to define and assess the combustible dust hazards within the Calaveras Power Station coal handling systems and develop a plan to effectively mitigate these hazards. With the study completed in 2015, CPS Energy started implementation of dust mitigation projects. This presentation will provide a summary of the study, an update on progress made to date, and future plans for safety improvements to the coal handling systems.
  • Speakers
    • Edwin Martin, Mgr. Plant Operations, CPS Energy
    • Andrew Astudillo, Engineer Assoc.2, CPS Energy
This presentation will discuss an incident where a contractor was burnt while removing hot fly ash and how the contractor engineered out the hazard.
  • Speaker
    • Jeff Mullins, Safety & Health Consultant, Lightstone Generation, LLC. - Gavin Power , LLC
The Mercury & Air Toxics Standards (MATS) rule requires coal-fired generating units to comply with emissions limits on filterable particulate matter (PM), acid gases (HCl), and mercury (Hg). The burning of low sulfur fuels, addition of lime-based sorbents for HCl control, and the reduction in SO3 for Hg control, can all tax the performance of the aging fleet of electrostatic precipitators (ESP).

This paper discusses three projects in which low ripple three-phase power supplies (TPPS) were used as part of the solution in reducing the ESP PM emissions. TPPS have been used on coal- fired boiler ESPs in Europe for many years, and in the past three years, Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) has more than 800 installations in China on cement kiln ESPs. Previous to this writing, there had been no installations of the TPPS in the United States (U.S.).

The first case study involves a U.S. utility that switched fuels for MATS compliance to a low sulfur, low chlorine, and low mercury western bituminous coal. Dry sorbent injection (DSI) utilizing hydrated lime was continuously used for acid gas trim. Prior to this project, the ESP could only achieve opacity compliance, while injecting hydrated lime, at 70% boiler load.

In the second case study, a utility plant needed to eliminate their reliance on an ESP SO3 conditioning system to reduce the use of activated carbon injection (ACI) for Hg control. Prior to the ESP upgrade, the unit could only achieve full load while utilizing SO3 to help the ESP’s performance. In both the first and second projects, numerous improvements were made to the ESP, including the addition of TPPS, to address MATS compliance.

This paper will identify the prime considerations when upgrading ESPs to achieve lower PM, HCl, and Hg emissions.
  • Speakers
    • Steven Marchigiano, Plant Manager – Duke Energy Crystal River, Duke Energy
    • John Knapik, Engineering Manager, Babcock & Wilcox
Georgia Pacific’s World Class Tissue Facility in Muskogee, Oklahoma implemented a comprehensive project to install wash down systems throughout all coal handling areas including unloading, reclaim, crusher, transfer points, main incline conveyor, and cascade rooms. This included new drainage systems, curbing, sealing, and trash sump pumps. The wash down systems utilized a variety of best practices learned at previous PRB Coal Users Group knowledge shares as well as improvements made by the supplier. This resulted in a system that covers > 95% of all surfaces and is utilized twice per day by the coal handling contractor. This presentation will provide a summary of the pre-project survey, nozzle arrangement for coverage, water flow and pressure design, drainage system layout, project construction, start-up and lessons learned.
  • Speakers
    • Brian Scott, Engineering Manager, Georgia-Pacific
    • Pete Zinecker, Director of Sales - West, Benetech Inc.
The Current Marketplace Is Demanding That Our Base Loaded Units:
• Become Load Following
• Be Able to Quickly Ramp Up and Down
• Be Able to Cycle On and Off
This mode of operation is hard on the boiler pressure parts and related auxiliary equipment, and on the operators.
Areas of concern include pressure parts, flues, ducts and casing. Damage to these components is typically related to thermally induced stresses.
Boiler load cycling, whether operating between low load and MCR throughout the day, or taking the unit off line and restarting as needed, has detrimental effects on components and associated equipment.
Awareness and understanding of potential component damage is the key to performing good inspections and making the necessary repairs.
If damage, as a result of boiler cycling, is identified and understood, there are both mechanical and operational remedies that can be implemented.
  • Speakers
    • Tyre Greenwood, Reliability/HM/Mechanical Engr. Mgr., Luminant
    • Michael Coveney, Manager, International Field Engineering, Babcock & Wilcox
  • Speakers
    • Nebraska City Station NC2 Silo A Puff
      Abstract
      Clint Zavadil, Supervisor-Machinist, Omaha Public Power District
    • Tripper Car Modification to Decrease Fugitive Dust
      Abstract
      Clint Zavadil, Supervisor-Machinist, Omaha Public Power District
    • Don’t Forget External Combustible Dust
      Abstract
      Greg Krieser, Division Manager - Production Operations, Omaha Public Power District (OPPD)
    • Dust Hazards Analysis
      Abstract
      Mr. Bob Taylor, President, CoalSAFETY, Inc.
A key to reducing the escape of coal dust from conveyor transfers is to control the airflow passing through the enclosure.
At the Ameren Rush Island power plant, air currents, induced by the coal moving through the transfer chutes combined with ventilation air supplied by large fans added to the reclaim tunnels when the plant had switched to PRB coal, combined to create a severe coal dust problems whenever coal was run into the plant.
The combination of ventilation air and induced air flow blew coal dust out the sides and end of the skirtboard, creating a mess and increasing the risk of fire. Every time coal was run, plant personnel were forced to clean the area, but an hour later, the area would look like it never had been cleaned.
In 2016, the plant undertook a project to enlarge the chute and improve the sealing on Conveyor 5B. The project used larger chute walls and internal dust curtains to create a ‘settling area’ inside the chute, and multiple-barrier sealing system to improve containment. The result: less airborne dust escaping the conveyor, to produce a cleaner area, with less cleanup labor and less risk.
In this presentation, Denny Loeffelman of Rush Island plant discusses the problem, and its solution. Mark Strebel of Martin Engineering will discusses how to calculate the size of a stilling zone, and the proper placement of dust curtains and edge seals.
  • Speakers
    • Controlling Transfer Point Airflow to Reduce Coal Dust at Rush Island
      Abstract
      Mike Schimmelpfennig, Consulting Engineer, Ameren Missouri
      Co-Authors
      • Gary Swearingen, Product Manager, Dust Management Group, Martin Engineering
    • Gary Swearingen, Product Manager, Dust Management Group, Martin Engineering
Regulatory pressures combined with current economic conditions are forcing coal fired units out of their traditional base load role and into a load following mode of operation. This means much more time at low loads, when stations must still meet emission compliance requirements.
The V-TempTM economizer provides a cost-effective design that allows SCR inlet gas temperature control, even at low loads.
Benefits Include:
• Total installed costs equal to or less than other gas temperature control alternatives
• Lower maintenance costs
• Extended turndown range
• Lower gas side pressure drop
• Adaptable for low load boiler turndown
  • Speaker
    • Mel Albrecht, Technical Fellow, Babcock & Wilcox
The MATS rule requires inspection and refurbishments of a boiler’s mechanical firing system and controls system. Following the inspection and refurbishment, the boiler must be tuned for optimal NOx and CO performance. Luminant has completed its first evolution of these MATS required inspections, refurbishments, and tunings on its entire coal boiler fleet. Luminant’s fleet includes tangentially fired pulverized coal, wall fired pulverizer coal, and circulating fluidized bed boilers. Each boiler style presents unique opportunities and challenges when completing the MATS activities. This presentation will discuss Luminant’s methodology and lessons learned from its first evolution of performing these MATS activities.
  • Speaker
    • Ben Lawrence, Engineer, Luminant
Crushers are a necessity in any coal fired power station, but can be the cause of many issues in a material handling system. If not implemented correctly, there can be high levels of dust, wear, and spillage in the material handling system. This presentation will review best practices for integrating different styles of crushers into a system, and how they will affect transfer chute performance, transfer chute liner wear, dust levels, and associated air flow through the system.
  • Speakers
    • Matt Deal, Material Handling Supervisor, Hoosier Energy REC, Inc.
    • Matt Koca, Principal Flowpath Engineer, FLEXCO
This session will offer several examples of external boiler wash down from the experts in the industry.
  • Panelists
    • Lawrence Energy Center Experience
      Abstract
      Brad Phillips, O, Westar Energy Jeffrey Energy Center
    • Floyd Mayo, Operations & Maintenance Manager, Georgia Power
    • Josh Anderson, Supervisor, Tuscon Electric Power
    • John Forbes, Plant Manager, C.P. Crane Station
- This paper will review the major means that utilities have used to handle Northern PRB coals. The Northern PRB coals typically have higher heating value (9200 vs 8800 Btu/lb) and higher sodium levels than the Southern PRB coals. There several other types of NPRB that will be described. Utilities have employed many methods to better utilize Northern PRB coals. These include: combustion improvements, cleaning equipment upgrades, boiler modifications, coal blending, dilution with ash, and chemical additives. This topic is important especially if NPRB coals are economically attractive.
  • Speakers
    • Dominic Martino, Senior Engineer Pulverizer\Gearbox SME, DTE Energy
    • Mr. Rod Hatt, President, Coal Combustion, Inc.

Thursday, April 13

"Conversations...amongst end users" This interactive forum is a closed session for those who use coal...generating companies, power plants, terminals employees. This year EEI Loss Control/Fire Protection Task Force members are also invited to provide additional perspective. Surveys from past users’ group meetings have shown that representatives value opportunities for candid discussions among themselves and open conversations with board members on issues raised during the first two days of the conference. This forum meets that request!. Let's converse about what's on your mind while you and your peers are together! After the forum, lunch will be served.

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